Crimson Fists Hellblaster Sergeant

My plasma incinerator is like the sun I never had.

– Ordoñez, Hellblaster Sergeant

Almost two years after finishing my first Crimson Fists Hellblaster, I’ve finally returned to add another member to this unit. I did start assembly work on this model quite a while ago, but rage-quit after accidentally breaking the last two pink 1.8mm LEDs that I had in stock!

The details and pose of this miniature are largely unaltered from the stock Dark Imperium model, although as you can see in the WIP image below I added an extra purity seal to the plasma gun. This was to help conceal an area of the gun I had to resculpt after installing the LED.

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The LED plasma effect was achieved using the techniques described in my original LED Plasma Weapon tutorial. If you’d like to have a go at plasma weapons but are worried this method is a bit too complex, I also have my Simple LED Plasma Weapon tutorial.

I’m sometimes asked “why pink for plasma?”. As I explain in the designer’s notes of my tutorial, there are a number of reasons I chose pink as my colour for plasma. Firstly, the range of miniature LEDs I use only has a finite selection of colours available, and I’d used a lot of the other colours already. Secondly, I’ve used argon plasma in semiconductor fabrication processes in a previous job, and that was pink, so I tend to associate pink with plasma. Thirdly, it’s pretty eye-catching, and tends to stand out among the other LEDs.

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That’s it for this week. Hopefully it won’t take me two years to get the next member of the squad finished! I’m trying to get through as much of the Dark Imperium box as I can before the Indomitus box (presumably) arrives in July. I’m really looking forward to adding the Primaris Space Marines from this new box to my Crimson Fists!

Genestealer Cult Nexos

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Do the unbelievers think that being surrounded by hostile blips just happens? No! It takes skill and dedication to have our brethren coming out of the goddamn walls!

– Kelbrech, Genestealer Nexos

The Genestealer Nexos is a model that I’ve been keen to give the LED treatment since the day it was released. Actually, since before it was released, as this was the one-and-only time I’ve correctly guessed an upcoming model from a Rumour Engine preview (fun fact, the Nexos design is based on an unreleased Genestealer Cult model from the early 90s)!


Nexos LED Hololith

So how was it done? I mostly followed the process detailed in my own LED Hololith tutorial, but with a few differences. I’ve detailed the important changes below.

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1. Rather than resin cast a small section, I found it easier to simply recast the whole top of the hololith map table in resin. If you’d like to know more about resin casting for LED effects, take a look at my tutorial here.

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2. I drilled a number of 4mm holes in the underside of the resin cast to allow the LED to sit snuggly in the component and to ensure the resin was thin enough to allow the light to shine through. This needs to be done slowly and carefully to ensure you don’t accidentally drill all the way through! If you do drill all the way through, then I’m afraid you’ll need to make another cast.

You can see in the image above that I drilled seven holes. This was just as result of my experiments to find the best position for the LEDs in relation to the detail on the map. You only actually need to drill one hole for each LED.

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3. Next I inserted my three LEDs, holding them in place with tiny dots of superglue on the side. At this stage it was important to ensure the legs of LEDs all had the same polarity on the same side, as this makes connecting them easier later. I used TruOpto 1.8mm red LEDs instead of the nano chip LEDs I specify in my hololith tutorial. This is because I wanted a slightly greater brightness and a larger angle of dispersion for the light, plus I had more room to play with on this project.

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4. Next I drilled holes in the plastic base of the hololith map table to allow the LED legs to pass through.

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5. I glued the top and bottom halves of the hololith table together, filling in the very slight gap around the edge with modelling putty. Then I trimmed off the excess length on the legs of the LEDs and wired them together in parallel. Then I attached two trailing leads which will connect the table to the base.

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6. Next I used modelling putty to hide the soldered connections of the LED legs. The putty looks a bit rough in the above image, but I tidied it up later, adding detail so it just looked like part of the machinery of the table.

I removed the plastic ‘wires’ that connect the table to the plastic ‘power pack’ on the model and replaced them with the actual wires. The wires pass out of a hole I drilled in the bottom of the plastic power pack and connect to the switch and battery under the base.

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7. Next I glued the plastic power pack into position and then hid the wires with the base texture material that I use. This texture material is pumice paste, but PVA and sand or any other texture material will also work.

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8. I covered the actual map with a lump of blu-tack and then undercoated and painted the model.

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9. Finally I applied a very thinned down coat of Citadel Contrast Flesh Tearers Red. I was careful to avoid pooling on flat surfaces and to keep the contrast paint in the recesses as much as possible. This is stage is just to give the map detail some definition and make the model look better when the LED is switched off, and shouldn’t actually effect the final brightness.

I’m sure a lot of people know about this fun Easter Egg, but in case you don’t, the hololith map actually shows an aerial view of Warhammer World!

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That’s it for this week, I hope you found all that informative. Revisiting my Genestealer Cult has reminded me that I could do with some group shots of the Cult of Celestial Wisdom, so perhaps that’s something I’ll get around to soon. Please don’t forget that if you’re interested in following my work then you can also find me on Instagram and Twitter where I give regular updates on my various projects.

My Crimson Fists on Warhammer Community Website

I feel slightly silly writing this post as it will mean that four of the last five posts on my website will have been “hey, have you seen my models featured on this thing?!”. But I just had to share the news that my Crimson Fists were featured on the Warhammer Community website on Saturday!

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There’s Captain Grimstone, front-and-centre on the preview image! My models were featured alongside the work of four other amazing hobbyists who have been sharing their painting using the #WarhammerCommunity hashtag on Twitter and Instagram. If you haven’t got involved with sharing your work online yet, then I’d really recommend joining in the fun. It’s a great way to meet other supportive, like-minded hobbyists.

Ok, that’s enough blowing my own trumpet for now! I promise that my next post will actually show some new miniatures!

My Crimson Fists Battalion on WarhammerTV

I’ve been very fortunate these past two weeks and was lucky enough to have my models make it onto Warhammer TV for a third time! My Crimson Fists Battalion featured alongside the work of other hobbyists on this week’s ‘Wednesday Hobby Round-Up’ on Warhammer TV (Wednesday 13th May episode, around the 8m30s mark, if you’re interested in seeing it).

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I’m very honoured to once again have had my work exhibited in this way, and a big thank you to Nick, Wade and the rest of the Warhammer Community Team for their kind words, especially the praise for the Lieutenant’s power sword. This reminded me that LED power weapons are a tutorial I haven’t got around to yet. Hopefully that’s something I can find the time to do sometime soon!

Crimson Fists Standard Bearer

Never trust a regiment with a spotless banner. These colours have flown over thousands of worlds, and will fly over a thousand more while I still draw breath.

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This Crimson Fists Primaris Ancient is a conversion of the plastic Primaris Ancient found in the Dark Imperium boxed set. Rather than building the standard model with its pristine banner, I decide to change it up a bit to more closely follow some of the classic artwork.,

Images (C) Games Workshop

I didn’t want to exactly copy either the original Rogue Trader cover image or the updated Primaris version. Instead I picked out features I liked, such as the chest cables and firing the bolter one handed. I did consider adding the bandaged head wound, but wasn’t sure I could pull it off, plus I didn’t feel it was quite in keeping with modern lore, particularly for a Primaris Marine!

The “tattered” banner that replaces the original banner is from a Fantasy Orc regiment and has been hanging out in my bits box for ages. I considered making it a white banner as in the original image but was worried it would look too much like a surrender flag!

I ummed and erred for quite a while as to what to paint on the banner. In the end I decided to keep it very simple. In some ways I felt it didn’t actually matter what was on the banner, as it was the overall impression of a well-worn banner being raised in defiance of a hostile galaxy that I was aiming for, rather than any specific details. To paint the Crimson Fists chapter symbol I followed the freehand guide for Imperial Fist symbol that I found here.

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For the LED muzzle flare, I simply used the processes detailed in my LED Muzzle Flare tutorial.

That’s it for this week. Come back again soon for more LED fun, including hopefully some Age of Sigmar!