More on Flesh Eaters Kill Team Caro

Last weekend I published an article about my new Flesh Eaters ‘Kill Team Caro’. During the week I’ve been sharing some extra close-up images and background snippets about each member of the unit on my Twitter and Instagram. Now that I’ve covered them all, I thought it would be nice to compile the images and information here on my website as well.

First up we have Sergeant Caro himself. The honour markings on his helmet indicate he is a veteran of the Flesh Eaters famous “Jaws of Doom” assault squad. He lead his kill team to infiltrate Partisan space and target key assets during the so-called “Sorrowful Years”, the period during the War of the False Primarch that saw mainly retrenchment and small scale skirmishes between Orthodox and Partisan forces.

Next we have Brother Orr. He is equipped with an Umbra Ferrox pattern bolt gun with autosense-linked scope. This weapon has similar range and stopping power to the much later marksman bolt carbine and was the bane of Partisan counter-insurgency forces throughout the War of the False Primarch.

Then we have Brother Holman. As the unit’s Helix Adept his medical skills keep them in fighting shape while behind enemy lines. He also carries the squad’s “Terror Banner”. Used by forces on both sides during the War of the False Primarch, they were unfurled at the moment the shooting starting, leaving their victims in no doubt as to who had come for them!

The fourth member of Flesh Eaters Infiltrator ‘Kill Team Caro’ is Brother Amos. Like the rest of his unit, Amos wears ‘Imperial pattern’ power armour, a rare archaic variant of MkVI ‘Corvus’ armour, characterised by its narrow greaves and external cabling. Brother Amos is proficient in the use of bolt weapons, as indicated by the circular tactical marking on his right pauldron.

The fifth and final member of Flesh Eaters Infiltrator ‘Kill Team Caro’ is Brother Stern. His bolter is equipped with a close combat attachment, an upgrade popular with the Flesh Eaters during the War of the False Primarch. These weapons were valued for the psychological damage they inflicted on the foe as much as the gruesome physical injuries they caused.

I think that’s enough Flesh Eaters for the moment! If you like what you’ve seen here and would like to make your own LED miniatures then I used the techniques detailed in my LED Eye Lens tutorial and my Simple LED Muzzle Flare tutorial. If you need electronics supplies and consumables, you can buy them here. That’s all for this week, see you again soon!

Flesh Eaters Space Marine Kill Team

Kill Team Caro’s modus operandi is simple. Steal in, explode out.

Chaplain Urias

Allow me to introduce ‘Kill Team Caro’, a Flesh Eaters Infiltrator kill team and my latest LED Space Marine project. This kill team was built with two things in mind; firstly, the new edition of the Kill Team game. Secondly, Apologist’s ‘War of the False Primarch’ community project. If you’ve never heard of the ‘War of the False Primarch’, then you’re not alone. This little-known piece of Imperial history takes place in the 34th Millennium, and is described in very few official sources.

The War of the False Primarch was a dark and bloody episode of the Imperium’s history, now largely lost to myth and purged from all records, that plunged the Segmentum Pacificus into anarchy from 780.M33 to 860.M33. The conflict was finally ended when the High Lords of Terra convened the Pentarchy of Blood and tasked five loyal Chapters to destroy eleven others that had been declared Traitoris Perdita for their actions during the war.

Imperial Armour Volume Two – Second Edition pg. 17

As Apologist was already building Silver Stars, a chapter linked with the False Primarch, I decided to join the so-called ‘Pentarchy of Blood’, those chapters who enacted the will of the High Lords of Terra on the wayward Partisan chapters. Of the five chapters who form the Pentarchy, the Flesh Eaters were the ones that appealed to me the most (and we know I already have a thing for off-beat Blood Angels successors). If you’d like to read more about the ‘War of the False Primarch’ community project, then check out the ‘Some Things Are Best Left Forgotten’ blog. You can read a battle report involving Kill Team Caro here, although you may notice their paint job was still a little “WIP” during that game!

Design & Building

From the start my intent was to alter the MkX Phobos armour type of the Infiltrators to more closely reflect the retro look of the so-called ‘Imperial Marine’. This was the very first Space Marine model produced by Games Workshop, pre-dating even the venerable RTB01 plastic Space Marine kit. The ‘Imperial Marine’ received an update in 2016 with a special anniversary plastic remake by Games Workshop. I adopted this aesthetic for my kill team to help them fit in with the early-Imperial period setting, and also to satisfy my love of “Beakie” Space Marines. To get the correct look, I made the changes listed below.

  • Swapped the helmet for a resin cast of the 2016 ‘Imperial Space Marine’ helmet
  • Swapped the shoulder pads and backpacks for the Forgeworld MkV/MkVI equivalents
  • Added 1mm wire antenna to MkVI backpacks (since Infiltrators have antenna on their backpacks)
  • Swapped the bolt carbines for Forgeworld Umbra Ferrox pattern bolt guns
  • Added power cables to the chest armour made from guitar strings
  • Re-sculpted the kneepads using modelling putty to match the distinctive ‘Imperial Space Marine’ angular kneepads
  • Removed the circular ankle stabilisers

You can also see my earlier take on this armour type with my Ultramarine Veteran. I was amused to see references to the ‘Imperial’ armour variant coincidently appear in a recent White Dwarf article about Space Marine armour types. My head-canon is that ‘Imperial’ armour is just a variant of MKVI armour, perhaps a lighter recon version.

For the LED effects, the helmet eye lenses followed the technique described in my LED Eye Lens tutorial, except using a  TruOpto 1.8mm Green LED instead of the red one used in the tutorial. Sergeant Caro’s muzzle flare used the methods described in my recent Simple LED Muzzle Flare tutorial. If you’re going to give this a go yourself then please don’t forget that you can buy electronic supplies and consumables here.

I also made an effort to make the helmets and muzzle flare still look acceptable when the LEDs were switched off. I applied two thin coats of Citadel Biel-Tan Green shade to the helmet eye lenses. This gives them some colour and definition without detracting from the brightness of the LED. The muzzle flare was painted using used the techniques mentioned in the tutorial, which is basically a Citadel Fuegan Orange shade and a Lamenters Yellow glaze.

Painting

As ever, when I list my painting recipes on this blog, I’m not only recording them for those of you who are interested, but also as a reminder for myself! All paints listed are from the Citadel range.

  • Red Armour Recipe
  • Chaos Black undercoat
  • Mephiston Red base coat
  • Agrax Earthshade wash in recesses
  • Evil Sunz Scarlet edge highlight
  • Wild Rider Red fine edge highlight
  • Chapter Symbol, Helmet Stripe & Insignia Recipe
  • ‘Sketched’ in with Administratum Grey
  • Filled in with Corax White
  • Basing Recipe
  • Sand, slate and PVA glue
  • Chaos Black undercoat
  • Rhinox Hide base coat on sand
  • Skavenblight Dinge base coat on slate
  • 50:50 Rhinox Hide:Zandri Dust drybrush on sand
  • 50:50 Skavenblight Dinge:Zandri Dust drybrush on slate
  • Zandri Dust drybrush on sand and slate
  • Middenland Tufts added
  • Rhinox Hide on base rims

Personalities & Insignia

Attempting to stick the the ‘retro’ aesthetic, I went ‘old-school’ with the insignia. Every Marine has their name on their shoulder pad, as well as the Rogue Trader-era black and white ‘bolter’ symbol. Space Marines used to have a symbol on their shoulder pad denoting which weapon they were equipped with! You may also notice the honour markings on Sergeant Caro’s helmet, which indicate he is a veteran of the famous ‘Jaws of Doom’ assault squad.

Brother Holman is a Helix Adept, basically an apothecary in training. I gave him a “Terror Banner” that he can unfurl once the Infiltrators have revealed themselves and the shooting begins. The Partisans shouldn’t be in any doubt about exactly who it is that has come for them! This is also a nod to the classic Blood Angel apothecary who carried a large banner in one hand. The banner is made from a Tactical Marine back banner turned on its side.

That’s all for today, I hope you enjoyed it. I’m really pleased with this unit, and think I may have caught the Flesh Eaters bug (metaphorically, not the actual one)! I’ll probably be posting more individual pictures of these models throughout the week on my Twitter and Instagram. I’ve had to stare at these guys for hours and hours, so now so does everyone else, haha!

Diorama Ork Casualties

‘Ere boss, Zagbog’z off iz ‘ead again, hur-hur!

Ork “humour”.

Following on from the post about my Armies on Parade 2021 entry, I thought it might be fun to take a closer look at the Ork casualties. The two that were front-and-centre are pictured above. The one of the left has just taken a headshot from a bolter, while the one on the right is fleeing from the Crimson Fists and has just been shot straight through the centre!

The technique I used for these two models is just my Simple LED Muzzle Flare technique, only instead of the flare coming out of a gun, it is coming out of the their bodies! I did originally consider mounting the Orks directly on the display board, but I decided to put them on bases instead for three reasons. Firstly, not being on bases would make them significantly shorter than the Marines. Secondly, if their positions were fixed on the board then I couldn’t make last minute tweaks to their location during photography. And thirdly, having them separate means that I can reuse them in future dioramas, or simply as an accessory to future battlefield photography.

As you may have noticed, the Ork who still has a face has had his expression and his pose altered to make him look like he is running away in panic. The expressions of the current plastic Ork Boyz are actually quite neutral, and therefore easy to alter. To make him look alarmed I simply applied a tiny amount of modelling putty to his forehead, altering his eyebrows so they were raised in the centre and down at the sides, which – along with the open mouth – is an expression we read in humans as distress. The Ork who has taken a headshot has been rocked back on his feet slightly, while his right wrist has been rotated to make the axe appear a bit more slack in his grip. I was trying to give the impression of the headshot having just happened that instant with the Ork still on the process of pitching backwards.

I also made a few Ork casualties to scatter around. Again these are made from the plastic Ork Boyz box. I ended up repositioning or removing limbs to make them appear to be sprawled on the ground as a result of being gunned down. They’re not glued to the board, again to allow repositioning as required. All the Ork casualties were intentionally painted with a muted colour scheme so that they didn’t draw the eye away from the Marines too much – the Crimson Fists were the stars of the show after all! They certainly didn’t receive my best paint job, but the submission deadline was looming and I knew they weren’t going to be the main focus of the photographs.

Lastly I had a bit of fun by adding the skeletal remains of an Ork to the ruined farmhouse. The first edition of 40K was more RPG-like than current editions, and in the original ‘Battle at the Farm’ scenario the GM was supposed to give the Ork commander – Thrugg Bullneck – a secret objective to retrieve a bag of hidden loot that was buried in the farm house. I thought it might be fun to add a little nod to this in the diorama. Thrugg’s remains are made from an Ork skull from the Citadel Skulls set, a modelling putty helmet and a spare Ork boy arm, all buried under lolly stick floorboards! The sack of loot is also sculpted entirely from modelling putty.

That’s all for today. I hope you’ve found that insight into the Ork casualties interesting.

“Revenge at the Farm” Crimson Fists ‘Armies on Parade’ 2021

Thirty-four years after the Warhammer 40,000 Rogue Trader introductory scenario “Battle at the Farm”, the Crimson Fists are back at the site of their infamous retreat for revenge – Primaris style! “Revenge at the Farm” is my entry for Games Workshop’s ‘Armies on Parade’ 2021 event. My entry to ‘Armies on Parade’ 2020 was quite simple, basically just a tiered hill to display the LED Crimson Fists that I’d completed so far. This time, I wanted to tell a bit more of a story!

Captain Grimstone of the Fourth Company oversees the purging of the ruined farmstead. Epistolary Gabriel, Crimson Fists Geokinetic, leads the Eradicators to secure the left flank.

“Purge the xenos! No survivors!” The Crimson Fists don’t have it all their own way though – kunnin’ kommandoes counter-attack from the treeline!

Hellblaster Squad Ordonéz provides covering fire from Bultha’s Rise. The Reivers home in on the red signal flares to secure the ruined generator.

Ancient Santec strides past the overgrown orchard and the ruins of the farmhouse. It looks like Thrugg Bullneck didn’t escape the original battle with his stolen loot. Perhaps the grot kommando will have more luck?

The farm – then and now. This is the map of the farm as shown in the Warhammer 40,000 first edition rulebook. I had to take some slight artistic license with the layout to accommodate the models in a pleasing way. For example, if the stone walls or ruined farmhouse were too tall then it would have obscured models behind. Similarly, I changed the contours of the hills to better display the units on that flank. I also “zoomed in” slightly on the map so I didn’t have a lot of ‘dead space’ behind the orchard. But overall I think it’s still recognisable as the same location.

That’s it for today, I hope you’ve enjoyed the pictures of my Crimson Fists and the display board. I’ll be back later in the week to take a closer look at some of the Orks who are not having a good day at the farm! As ever, please don’t forget that if you want to have a go at LED miniatures yourself then my tutorials are here and you can shop for the required tools and consumables here.

Kaptin Gron, Kommando Nob

I klawed my way to da top, hurr-hurr-hurr!

– Kaptain Gron, Kommando Nob

Next from the Octarius Kommando Kill Team Orks we have Kaptain Gron, Kommando Nob. This is a fantastic sculpt and originally I was going to leave it untouched. However I have been mulling over the idea of attempting to create an “crackling electrical surface discharge” effects with LEDs on a power fist or power klaw, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity to give it a whirl! I did also consider making the backpack radar dish rotate, but in the end decided that would be a little too much effort!

Painting & Assembling

So how did I make the crackling electrical discharge effect on the power klaw?

  1. I drilled through the model’s leg, torso and arm to add three Blue Ultra Nano SMD Chip LED (3V) from the website Small Scale Lights. They are all connected in parallel with a 3V coin cell battery, 10Ω resistor and switch in the base. For more information on hiding batteries in miniature bases, see my LED Eye Lens tutorial.
  2. Next I applied Water Splash Effect Gel, available from Green Stuff World, to begin creating the path of the electrical “arc”.
  3. Once the initial application of gel has dried – which may take several hours – I applied the next layer, increasing the length of the “arcs”.
  1. I continued to apply layers of gel until I was happy with the shape of the “arcs”. As you can see, I joined them up to make it look like the electricity was arcing between different points on the power klaw.
  2. Once the final layer of gel was dry, I applied a thin layer of Citadel Guilliman Blue glaze, just to make the electrical effect look a little more interesting when the LEDs are switched off. Unfortunately this colour is discontinued now, but a thinned-down coat of Citadel Contrast Talassar Blue would have the same effect.
  3. Jobs a good ‘un, boss!

I’m not sure if the crackling electrical discharge effect I was picturing in my head has fully translated to the model, but it was a fun experiment anyway! In terms of painting, I stuck to the retro-inspiring Blood Axe Kommando scheme I mentioned in my previous post. Even though Kaptain Gron is the leader of the team I still stuck to the limited colour palette. I think this helps to give the whole unit a more cohesive look on the tabletop.

That’s it for this week. More Octarius Orks soon, plus some more Badab campaign, Armies on Parade revisited and something a bit different! See you all again soon.