Indomitus Crimson Fists Primaris Lieutenant

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CHOOM!

– Lieutenant Alehoc

A week ago today I received delivery of the wonderful Indomitus boxed set. Normally I wouldn’t start a project with an HQ model – I feel that’s something you have to build up to! But the new Lieutenant is my favourite model in the Indomitus set, plus it was the one that I had the clearest vision for. I’ve known what I wanted to do with it from the moment I saw the previews.

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This model was not only a record build and paint for one of my LED models (less than a week), but also one of the rare occasions where a model ends up looking exactly as I imagined! I’m very pleased with how it has turned out.

 

To achieve this volkite effect I simply followed the process that I used in my LED muzzle flare tutorial, except rather than sculpting the standard muzzle flare, I tried to capture the distinctive volkite muzzle flare seen in the artwork. You can see what the resin effect looks like the the LED off in the pictures below. The LED I used was a TruOpto 1.8mm Red LED.

 

That’s all for today. More Indomitus models to come soon!

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Crimson Fists Hellblaster Sergeant

My plasma incinerator is like the sun I never had.

– Ordoñez, Hellblaster Sergeant

Almost two years after finishing my first Crimson Fists Hellblaster, I’ve finally returned to add another member to this unit. I did start assembly work on this model quite a while ago, but rage-quit after accidentally breaking the last two pink 1.8mm LEDs that I had in stock!

The details and pose of this miniature are largely unaltered from the stock Dark Imperium model, although as you can see in the WIP image below I added an extra purity seal to the plasma gun. This was to help conceal an area of the gun I had to resculpt after installing the LED.

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The LED plasma effect was achieved using the techniques described in my original LED Plasma Weapon tutorial. If you’d like to have a go at plasma weapons but are worried this method is a bit too complex, I also have my Simple LED Plasma Weapon tutorial.

I’m sometimes asked “why pink for plasma?”. As I explain in the designer’s notes of my tutorial, there are a number of reasons I chose pink as my colour for plasma. Firstly, the range of miniature LEDs I use only has a finite selection of colours available, and I’d used a lot of the other colours already. Secondly, I’ve used argon plasma in semiconductor fabrication processes in a previous job, and that was pink, so I tend to associate pink with plasma. Thirdly, it’s pretty eye-catching, and tends to stand out among the other LEDs.

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That’s it for this week. Hopefully it won’t take me two years to get the next member of the squad finished! I’m trying to get through as much of the Dark Imperium box as I can before the Indomitus box (presumably) arrives in July. I’m really looking forward to adding the Primaris Space Marines from this new box to my Crimson Fists!

Genestealer Cult Nexos

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Do the unbelievers think that being surrounded by hostile blips just happens? No! It takes skill and dedication to have our brethren coming out of the goddamn walls!

– Kelbrech, Genestealer Nexos

The Genestealer Nexos is a model that I’ve been keen to give the LED treatment since the day it was released. Actually, since before it was released, as this was the one-and-only time I’ve correctly guessed an upcoming model from a Rumour Engine preview (fun fact, the Nexos design is based on an unreleased Genestealer Cult model from the early 90s)!


Nexos LED Hololith

So how was it done? I mostly followed the process detailed in my own LED Hololith tutorial, but with a few differences. I’ve detailed the important changes below.

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1. Rather than resin cast a small section, I found it easier to simply recast the whole top of the hololith map table in resin. If you’d like to know more about resin casting for LED effects, take a look at my tutorial here.

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2. I drilled a number of 4mm holes in the underside of the resin cast to allow the LED to sit snuggly in the component and to ensure the resin was thin enough to allow the light to shine through. This needs to be done slowly and carefully to ensure you don’t accidentally drill all the way through! If you do drill all the way through, then I’m afraid you’ll need to make another cast.

You can see in the image above that I drilled seven holes. This was just as result of my experiments to find the best position for the LEDs in relation to the detail on the map. You only actually need to drill one hole for each LED.

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3. Next I inserted my three LEDs, holding them in place with tiny dots of superglue on the side. At this stage it was important to ensure the legs of LEDs all had the same polarity on the same side, as this makes connecting them easier later. I used TruOpto 1.8mm red LEDs instead of the nano chip LEDs I specify in my hololith tutorial. This is because I wanted a slightly greater brightness and a larger angle of dispersion for the light, plus I had more room to play with on this project.

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4. Next I drilled holes in the plastic base of the hololith map table to allow the LED legs to pass through.

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5. I glued the top and bottom halves of the hololith table together, filling in the very slight gap around the edge with modelling putty. Then I trimmed off the excess length on the legs of the LEDs and wired them together in parallel. Then I attached two trailing leads which will connect the table to the base.

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6. Next I used modelling putty to hide the soldered connections of the LED legs. The putty looks a bit rough in the above image, but I tidied it up later, adding detail so it just looked like part of the machinery of the table.

I removed the plastic ‘wires’ that connect the table to the plastic ‘power pack’ on the model and replaced them with the actual wires. The wires pass out of a hole I drilled in the bottom of the plastic power pack and connect to the switch and battery under the base.

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7. Next I glued the plastic power pack into position and then hid the wires with the base texture material that I use. This texture material is pumice paste, but PVA and sand or any other texture material will also work.

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8. I covered the actual map with a lump of blu-tack and then undercoated and painted the model.

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9. Finally I applied a very thinned down coat of Citadel Contrast Flesh Tearers Red. I was careful to avoid pooling on flat surfaces and to keep the contrast paint in the recesses as much as possible. This is stage is just to give the map detail some definition and make the model look better when the LED is switched off, and shouldn’t actually effect the final brightness.

I’m sure a lot of people know about this fun Easter Egg, but in case you don’t, the hololith map actually shows an aerial view of Warhammer World!

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That’s it for this week, I hope you found all that informative. Revisiting my Genestealer Cult has reminded me that I could do with some group shots of the Cult of Celestial Wisdom, so perhaps that’s something I’ll get around to soon. Please don’t forget that if you’re interested in following my work then you can also find me on Instagram and Twitter where I give regular updates on my various projects.

Nighthaunt Dreadwarden with LED Candles

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A gentle tapping downstairs in the wee small hours,

A whisper in the empty room that’s never used,

A snapping twig behind you on the lonely road,

You are never truly alone in the Tallowlands.

These are the first finished models (unless you count Darrakar) for the small Age of Sigmar Nighthaunt force I’m putting together called “The Uncharnel”.

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Who are The Uncharnel you ask? Legend tells they were a band of mercenaries who betrayed the Duardin of old. They paid a kin-traitor for knowledge of the secret tunnels and vaults deep below Hollow Mountain and sought to steal the heirloom treasure right out from under the Mountain Folk.

But a traitor’s tongue can be bought twice, and the mercenaries were betrayed. In their wrath, the Duardin collapsed the secret tunnels, burying the avaricious humans alive.

And there they remained for untold ages, as unquiet spirits consumed by greed and a hatred of the living, until the fateful day they were released by the Ghoul King of Hollow Mountain. But that’s a tale for another time…

LED Candles

When it came to LEDs in my Nighthaunt, I knew I didn’t want to have them in every model as I do with my Crimson Fists, mainly because it would be so time consuming! But that doesn’t mean I can’t have a few here and there; in lanterns and candles for example.

So how were the LED candles achieved? I’m not going to do a full tutorial, as most of the process is very similar to existing tutorials. For example, my LED Psykers tutorial covers the essentials of inserting a battery into a bases and running wires up miniature arms, so if you’re new to LEDs and want to give this a try then that is your best starting point. As for the candle flames themselves:

1. I used three 3V White Ultra Nano SMD Chip LEDs (note: ‘white’, not ‘warm white’) available from Small Scale Lights.  All three LEDs are connected in parallel to the same battery. The wires are wrapped around the candle holder. The arm was too thin to drill easily so I cut it out and replaced it with the wires, as shown in the picture below. The wires run down to the base along the back of the robes.

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2. Next I built up the candles with modelling putty to hide the wires. I also rebuilt the arm around the wires using modelling putty, and re-sculpted part of the robes to hide the wires running down to the base.

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3. Next I applied Water Splash Effect Gel, available from Green Stuff World, to build up a “flame” around the LEDs. You’ll need to apply it in several layers to build up a flame shape. The gel instructions recommend leaving it for 24 hours between applications to allow the previous layer to dry, but for this small amount I found 12 hours was sufficient.

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4. Continue to build-up layers of splash effect gel until you are happy with the flame shape.

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5. Once the final layer of splash gel has dried, coat each “flame” with Lahmian Medium as a basecoat, then apply two thick coats of Hexwraith Flame technical paint, waiting for each layer of paint to dry. The Hexwraith Flame acts as a filter, making the white light appear green. And yes I do mean thick coats, otherwise it won’t have any effect!

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6. That’s all there is to it really. Just make sure you’re happy that the flames look green enough for your tastes when the LED is on. If not, apply as much Hexwraith Flame as required. Just make sure you don’t obscure the LED completely!

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Painting

Just in case anyone is interested in the paint scheme I used, it’s closely based on the ‘Classic Style’ paint scheme shared for the Emerald Host in the December 2019 issue of White Dwarf. The ghostly ectoplasm is Grey Seer undercoat > 50:50 Hexwraith Flame:Lahmian Medium > thinned Ulthuan Grey > White Scar highlight.

With the bases, I wanted to give the impression of the ghosts being deep underground, perhaps in a crypt far below the Hollow Mountain (more on that another time). The recipe was Grey Seer undercoat > Basilicanum Grey contrast > Administratum Grey drybrush > White Scar drybrush.

I quite like the effect this creates, almost a ‘static’ or low light ‘night vision’ effect, like the only think you can see clearly is the glowing spectre as it drifts towards you, slowly reaching out a withered hand…

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More from the Tallowlands

The Tallowlands is a joint project by my gaming group, the Plastic Crack Rehab Clinic (PCRC) to create our own little narrative corner of the Mortal Realms. If you’d like to read more about the Tallowlands or see some of the other forces being created to inhabit it, you can check out the Tallowlands blog here.

My Crimson Fists on Warhammer Community Website

I feel slightly silly writing this post as it will mean that four of the last five posts on my website will have been “hey, have you seen my models featured on this thing?!”. But I just had to share the news that my Crimson Fists were featured on the Warhammer Community website on Saturday!

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There’s Captain Grimstone, front-and-centre on the preview image! My models were featured alongside the work of four other amazing hobbyists who have been sharing their painting using the #WarhammerCommunity hashtag on Twitter and Instagram. If you haven’t got involved with sharing your work online yet, then I’d really recommend joining in the fun. It’s a great way to meet other supportive, like-minded hobbyists.

Ok, that’s enough blowing my own trumpet for now! I promise that my next post will actually show some new miniatures!