Ancient Santec, Dreadnought of the Fourth Company

This galaxy has a million ways to kill you. I simply never found one that suited me.

Ancient Santec, Dreadnought

Most of my recent posts have started with a lament about how many years a given unit has taken to make and paint. But although this Redemptor Dreadnought has been sat on my ‘Shelf of Shame’ since 2017, once I actually picked it up and started work the assembly and painting only took about three weeks. Behold Ancient Santec, Redemptor Dreadnought of the Fourth Company of the Crimson Fists!

The banner was a little addition to echo the dreadnoughts of the past and give a bit of a retro vibe. I was particularly picturing the metal dreadnoughts with large banners that were very common in second edition Warhammer 40K. The fist on the banner is one of the Forge World Imperial Fist brass insignia set (sadly now OOP I believe), and the banner itself is the company banner from the Company Command box.

‘Onslaught’ Assault Cannon

Of course it wouldn’t be a new addition to my Crimson Fists if there wasn’t some sort of electronics involved. There are the LED lights on the chassis and also the LED muzzle flare which are obvious from the photos. But in addition to these there is also the motorised assault cannon…

So how was this done? I’m afraid the looming Armies on Parade deadline has prevented me from finding the time to write a full tutorial, but perhaps this is something I’ll come back to later. However I have included a quick summary of parts below, as well as a photo so you can see how it all went together.

  • The motor is a 3V DC micro miniature motor (6mm x 10mm) that I picked-up from eBay a while ago. These are the sort of motors used in model helicopters. The supplier I got it from has gone, but a quick search of eBay or Amazon will turn up many similar items.
  • The motor is connected to a 3V battery in the base via a circuit that has two switches in parallel. One switch is a standard sub-miniature toggle switch that I use in most of my projects. This is for turning the assault cannon on for extended periods when it’s on display. The other switch is a miniature ‘push to make’ switch which I added to the top of the base that I could use to activate the assault cannon for a quick burst during gameplay. Activating either switch independently will activate the assault cannon. I had originally hoped to find a latching push switch that would have fulfilled both roles, but I couldn’t find one that was as small as I wanted.
  • A length of 2mm square hollow tube was used to make the lower ‘support’ below the barrels and hide the muzzle flare LED wires. Again, this was sourced from eBay.
  • The muzzle flare was illuminated by two 0805 3V yellow chip LEDs. These are on a separate circuit to the motor.
  • The resin muzzle flare was made using the casting techniques described in my tutorial.

As you can see in the picture below, the ‘push to make’ switch on the top of the base is hidden under an Ork skull. It seemed fitting somehow – if you want the assault cannon to fire, press down on the dead greenskin!

So that is 60 Power of Crimson Fists complete! I’m really pleased with Ancient Santec – not just with the electronic effects, but also the paintjob, which I think is one of my neatest to date. Now it’s onwards to Armies on Parade 2020, and I feel like I’m on the home straight! All that remains is to finish the display board…

4 thoughts on “Ancient Santec, Dreadnought of the Fourth Company

  1. Guillem

    Nice work, as always.
    I’have been thinking about the same idea with the assault cannon, but the motors that I have seen they look too fast (about 40000 rpm+-) and I didn’t know if they will look realistic or not. How many rpm is your motor? Have you got any problem with it?
    I like how you have “solved” the on-off button, thats a great idea.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks! 😁 Assuming that’s not a typo, 40,000 rpm does sound a bit high! I bought that motor quite a while ago and can’t find the exact specs but I think it’s about 4,000 rpm. Interestingly a quick Google shows a real Gatling gun rpm to be 2,000 – 6,000 rpm, so I’d say anything in that ball-park would look about right. 🙂

      Like

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